• Day 1 28 October 2019
  • Day 2 29 October 2019
  • Display All
  • Acton Theatre
  • Canberry Room
  • Foyer
  • Griffin Room
  • Lennox Room
  • Molonglo Theatre
  • Seminar Room 3
  • Springbank Room
coffee cup
08:00 AM - 09:15 AMRegistration – Crawford School, Foyer, level 1
Tulipes
09:15 AM - 09:45 AMWelcome to EdTechPosium 2019 ‘Place, purpose, possibilities’ – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By Associate Professor Alexandra WebbThe Australian National University

Opening address by Associate Professor Alexandra Webb, College of Health and Medicine, The Australian National University

09:45 AM - 10:45 AMKeynote 1: What’s in it for me? Building online spaces that support the right kinds of education – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By Martin DougiamasFounder of Moodle

Moodle is well-known for its eponymous learning platform, used globally, with a focus on collaborative and active learning. Despite this design focus Moodle is often used in different ways that reflect the learning methods that teachers experienced in their own education. Martin will argue that a number of these methods contribute to a problematic culture in student learning. Martin is an advocate for the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals that seek to address these potentially negative trends. He will present some ideas, including some new Moodle products being developed, that provide alternative learning spaces to influence educators to move down better paths.

Find out more about Martin Dougiamas

Teapot and cup
10:45 AM - 11:15 AMMorning Tea – Springbank room and Canberry room, level 1
11:15 AM - 11:45 AMSession 1: A Semantic Map and Matrix of Audiovisual Learning Objects – Griffin room, level 1 By Michael GleesonGriffith University

As higher education innovates with blended models of delivery, pre-recorded audiovisual resources are playing an increasingly large part of course content delivery and the student experience. A higher-level design heuristic is required in order for an educationally embedded, holistic and sustainable production of these resources to occur in universities. In this project, we refer to his design heuristic as the combined use of a semantic map and matrix of development for audiovisual learning objects. Their purpose is twofold: to align audiovisual learning objects to course learning outcomes and to achieve well-designed objects at scale of production for a large, comprehensive university. We discuss the implementation of the semantic map and matrix for the development and integration of AV learning objects, emphasising the educational thought behind the map and matrix and the strategies necessary in order to design a university-level coordinated approach to the production of AV learning objects that will be able to meet the needs of more than 400 degree programs.

11:15 AM - 11:45 AMSession 2: So what is Plagiarism? Why would you need an Anti-Plagiarism Solution? – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Joanne NorburyAndrogogic (Sponsor)

With easy access to information today, original content and copyright rights are highly valued in both the higher education and corporate world. Joanne, a Senior Educational Technologist from Androgogic, will lead a discussion on plagiarism and demonstrate a new, easily integrated tool that supports users to detect their own plagiarism and understand how to cite sources while providing a reliable and scalable automatic text recognition system. She claims that anti-plagiarism software has operated in a monopolised industry, but that, in Urkund, Australians now have a superior and compelling alternative. “The partnership between Androgogic and Urkund is set to be the best of breed anti-plagiarism solution that the educational technology market has been waiting for”, says Joanne, “an effective, scalable solution with industry leading integration that’s easy to use.”

11:15 AM - 11:45 AMSession 3: Making Connections: Using a Multimodal Approach to Enhance Communication Skills – Lennox room, level 1 By A/Prof Jane Frost and Fellon GaidaUniversity of Canberra

Successful relationships are built on meaningful connections. Using 360 degree technology, digital platforms and realistic patient-centred interaction, students were able to negotiate the complexities of communication in a safe environment and build confidence in their own abilities. A multimodal technology-enhanced approach was used to explore the development of building meaningful connections with people through artefacts in order to facilitate relationship building. This approach was based in transformative learning principles and involved 4 separate activities scaffolded in order to provide a range of experiences from which students could learn, and on which they could reflect. Artefacts such as personal items and photographs allow connections to be made between past and present, time and place, and metaphorically to identity, belonging and attachment. Used to initiate conversation with others, artefacts provided a powerful way to prepare students to connect and build therapeutic relationships with patients.

11:15 AM - 11:45 AMSession 4: A Blind Taste Test: Managing Large-Scale User Testing of Alternative Systems – Acton Theatre, level 1 By Dr Russell Waldron and Dr Michael de RaadtCanberra Grammar School

How can we avoid bias in the testers of a proposed systems? How can we assess functionality when many of our users have preferences for the form of one system over another? We devised a blind taste test – as close as we could reasonably achieve. As we approached the selection of the school’s main education technology platform, portal, intranet and communications system, we knew that many staff would have loyalties, preferences or apprehension toward particular candidate systems. We engaged in substantial process to bring the right candidates forward: gathering criteria from a wide range of stakeholders, weighting criteria according to stakeholder priorities, and grading software on each criteria to establish a well-justified shortlist. We then established three test sandboxes, populating them with similar test data including both sample content and user accounts, and “branding” them similarly with school colours and styling. We wrote test scripts to guide unfamiliar users through the testing of each function that had been prioritised by stakeholders. Our testers were selected by managers in areas across the school and included teachers, support staff, parents, multilingual users and students. In this presentation we’ll describe the delivery and execution of the testing plan, key results, and reflections on the process. 

11:45 AM - 12:15 PMSession 5: Innovating internships for supporting students in work-integrated learning – Griffin room, level 1 By Dr Penny KyburzThe Australian National University

Work integrated learning and professional practice skills are fundamental to computer science education, in addition to forming a requirement for professional body accreditation of our courses. The Research School of Computer Science at ANU offers internship placements as a project-based work integrated learning opportunity for undergraduate and masters students. Our Computer Science Internship program is innovative in its design, as it provides three streams: (1) placement in a host organisation, (2) an academic project-based program and assessment, and (3) professional mentoring and support via workshops and peer circles. Students entering internship placements find themselves challenged by leaving the university to engage in work integrated learning, and even more so if they are international students encountering foreign workplace culture. We support our students in managing and growing through these challenges by providing a supportive network, both academically and professionally. This presentation will cover the design, development, ongoing improvements, challenges, and outcomes of our internship program.

Happy Students
11:45 AM - 12:15 PMSession 6: Is interactive learning social constructivism? Discuss (interactively | socially) – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Dr Joseph Hughes,The Australian National University

There is an increasing prominence of student engagement and interactive learning in higher education discourse. Is interactive learning “just” social constructivism rebranded? Or is there something more fundamental at play here? What role does, could, or should technology play in this landscape? (Why) Do these questions matter? This will not be a “presentation” where I “deliver” answers to these questions. Instead, participants will enter a dialogue aimed at providing (re)newed perspectives to inform both their purpose and possibilities for action in the neo-liberal higher education climate. I will posit that while there is significant overlap, interactive learning is more than social constructivism, but also that social constructivism is more than interactive learning: they have complementary distinctions. Discussing and debating these questions does matter because it raises to the surface our teaching philosophies, practices and strategies: it empowers us to make informed decisions about our actions towards the common goal of student learning. In this presentation, participants will be expected to contribute by engaging interactively and socially, and should BYOD. I encourage a robust discussion and active contribution to the dialogue. The presentation will close with some reflections on how my understanding of the topic has evolved, based on participant contributions.

11:45 AM - 12:15 PMSession 7: Designing eLearning environments for reflection: Applying Moon’s preparation guidelines – Lennox room, level 1 By Sara AbdelmawgoudUNSW Canberra

Preparing students to reflect is one of the key elements of reflective learning. Although the importance of preparation before reflection is clear, it takes a long time and thus it affects the planning and structure of academic experience, learning timing and duration. As a result, researchers suggest creating online ways to facilitate reflective preparation practices. This paper focuses on Moon’s (2004) reflection preparation guidelines and introduces a design that can be used to apply Moon’s reflection preparation practices to an online environment.

11:45 AM - 12:15 PMSession 8: meriSTEM: Leveraging academic expertise to maximise secondary school science impact – Acton Theatre, level 1 By Jay RidgewellThe Australian National University

meriSTEM is an ANU STEM education initiative providing comprehensive, curriculum-aligned, modular resources for senior secondary teachers, enabling them to ‘flip’ their classrooms in order to maximise deep, engaged learning. The purpose of meriSTEM is to increase student achievement, independent inquiry and critical thinking skills in STEM core subjects, while also increasing teacher capacity to facilitate this learning.
Since 2016, meriSTEM has provided a senior physics course to schools across Australia. In 2019 we are continuing to improve this course, while developing equivalent offerings in chemistry, biology, Earth and environmental sciences, and maths. meriSTEM uses Open edX and other free online software to provide the student self-paced component of the resources and we are using multiple methods to improve the accessibility to all Australian students, regardless of physical location and digital resources. In the presentation, we will briefly explain how the request from local teachers set the wheels in motion to establish the meriSTEM program, what we have learned thus far through working with secondary teachers and students and where we are heading next. We will summarise responses from teachers and students using meriSTEM in 2019, and our research questions for a formal evaluation of the project in the coming years.

12:15 PM - 01:15 PMLunch – Springbank room and Canberry room, level 1
Erica Southgate
01:15 PM - 02:15 PMKeynote 2: Immersive VR is not one thing: Pedagogical lessons on using VR in real classrooms and how I respond to (pesky) talk of ‘scaling up’ – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By A/Prof Erica Southgate University of Newcastle

This talk will draw on my research on using immersive virtual reality in educational contexts to tease out the interaction between pedagogical, ethical and technical aspects of the technology as they are dealt with in the current literature, and in actual classrooms. The talk will focus on how the literature frames the pedagogy of the technology and the limitation of this for empowering educators to experiment with it and adopting it as part of the fabric of the (physical and virtual) classrooms. The talk will canvas ethical issues that need to addressed and examine why the ‘scaling up’ discourse which permeates the field of immersive learning misunderstands the educational issues related to this emerging technology.

Find out more about Associate Professor Erica Southgate

02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 9 – Workshop: Using gamification to create engaging interactive virtual reality teaching resources – Griffin room, level 1 By Claire SeldonNSW Department of Education

Virtual reality (VR) is an innovative new tool available to teachers, both as designers of content and as a tool for student creation. The increased availability of VR equipment and software offers teachers ways to access the VR in their classrooms, this course aims to update their knowledge on how to design and use virtual experiences.​ This workshop will showcase an example of a virtual reality experience that has been designed as an interactive student centred resource by applying the principals of gamification to resource design. Teachers will then be introduced to some web based software that will allow them to create similar experiences.

02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 10 – Workshop: Using Snapchat to enhance learning in the higher education classroom – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Terra StarbirdThe Australian National University

Meet your students where they are by using Snapchat. Social media tools will never replace what a lecturer does, but instead they can amplify a message and clarify content, as well as engage students on their digital turf. Learn the multiple ways you can use Snapchat to engage directly with your students and build core skills and knowledge. This will be a hands-on workshop, focussed on developing the skills to use Snapchat in the higher education classroom to bring the content to life. In the session, participants will learn a number of features of Snapchat that translate directly to higher education, from documenting laboratory practice and field work to the study of art and historical artefacts. Snapchat can also be a great way for lecturers connect with and engage their students, even in larger cohorts. In embracing new technologies, we humanise ourselves to our students and demonstrate that true growth and change happens when we get out our comfort zones and challenge ourselves. Change can be hard and uncomfortable, but in order to evolve and improve our teaching practice, we need to embrace change and take risks.

02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 12 – Workshop: Online course design strategies to increase learning engagement: a meaningful hands-on course design exercise for educators – Acton Theatre, level 1 By Mushtak DawoodUNSW Canberra

With increased demand to provide a greater access to content in higher education, universities have been focusing on developing their online learning courses and programs offered. Blended learning is well established in academia; however, the effectiveness of course design on student’s engagement remains uncertain. Instructors dedicated to teaching and learning are under pressure to explore and evaluate strategies for getting students engaged in their studies. This workshop explores techniques to make online learning productive and engaging, but, more importantly, develop a process for designing courses with student’s engagement in mind. It provides practical and relevant strategies to instructors interested in the integration of planned activities to support a better student’s interaction with the learning process. This hands-on experience will focus on incorporating innovative, synchronous and asynchronous course design strategies and weaving pedagogy into the learning and teaching experience.

Teapot and cup
03:15 PM - 03:45 PMAfternoon tea – Canberry Room and Springbank room, level 1
03:45 PM - 04:15 PMSession 13: How educational and digital lives intersect: Millennials and Gen Z reveal their university experiences through digital storytelling – Griffin room, level 1 By Tingting Yu & Assoc. Prof. Peter BryantThe University of Sydney

How educational and digital lives intersect at the University: Millennials and Generation Z students reveal learning experience through digital storytelling

03:45 PM - 04:15 PMSession 14: Incorporating User Experience principles in your course design without web design experience – how basic customisation can keep learners engaged with your course – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Lisa CaseyDeakin University/Australian Defence College

This presentation aims to help teachers and course creators with their learning design from a User Experience perspective. User Experience is very important in the technological age we live in, as learners expect a certain level of quality and behaviour of online delivery. Rather than creating a course with limited resources or support or using it as a filing cabinet, we will show you are some simple web design and multimedia concepts to make your course more engaging and user friendly. Ease of use, accessibility support, responsiveness of course layout, future proofing, H5P, block and section customisation, and interactive elements are important areas to focus on when developing your course. This presentation is for everyone, the material can help beginners to use some basic interactive tools with no coding experience required, through to those building custom HTML elements to their course. We will also cover ways to keep a online students engaged, through various tools like forums, chats, and virtual classroom. We will also teach you how to build a course template that you can backup and restore for other courses, without breaking any customised elements you’ve built.

03:45 PM - 04:15 PMSession 15: Using Moodle in teaching academic english to international students preparing for a university education – Lennox room, level 1 By Freda Pappas & Mario TorrelliStudy Group Australia (Taylors College)

Teaching English to International students who are about to embark on their tertiary education requires a considered approach, encompassing listening, speaking, reading and writing. As a result this presentation will firstly focus on discussing second language acquisition theories that are now applied to Moodle so that practical activities can be developed to support the teaching of English in a digital environment. The fact that International students arrive with varying levels of computer literacy means the Foundation Program is also responsible for assisting students to learn essential computing skills through Moodle. Such skills are developed as students progress through structured lessons and are graded by Moodle. The presentation will also demonstrate the appropriateness of Moodle for enhancing English skills and how traditional methods can be incorporated within the Second Language learning classroom. The presentation will be supported with currently used Moodle activities that can be adapted and used in most classrooms or teaching programs.

03:45 PM - 04:15 PMSession 16: Moruya Mud Fun Play Build: How we used music and dance to fuel the construction of an architecturally engineered multipurpose structure and extract educational outcomes from the process – Acton Theatre, level 1 By David MitsakMud Fun

For the past several years SOL Illawarra Cultural Arts has been working on a vision to validate the power of music, dance,
theatrics, cooperation and teamwork in terms of the real tangible results it can deliver. We decided that nothing could be more tangible than durable shelter. To this end, school teachers (general) music teachers, cultural performing artists and construction industry professionals have been collaborating to develop the “musical mud stomp” and incorporate it into a unique construction process. The results are the creation of architecturally engineered multi-purpose structures on school premises and public spaces and a process that involves the whole community and gives a real sense of ownership in the building. We are simultaneously reviving heritage earthen masonry construction techniques that are culturally significant, environmentally friendly and in ways that give teachers new ideas on how curriculum can be taught. Youth add a unique value to the process that stimulates further questions about the value of play.

Mike Seymour
04:15 PM - 05:15 PMKeynote 3: To Affinity and Beyond. Applying entertainment industry technology in digital people in the education sector – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By Mike SeymourCo-founder of fxguide.com and researcher at Motus Lab at the University of Sydney

In keeping with this year’s theme of place, purpose, possibilities, we explore the possibility of using AI and digital people as both educators and educational surrogates. Imagine if your lectures could be updated online by an AI engine.  Perhaps altering a recording of your previous lecture, or updating the video to show you teaching new material? What benefits could this technology bring to students?  Would a girl learn maths better online from a digital avatar that looks like her same age?  Or what if that digital girl was a digital version of herself?

Imagine, if you could leave the University, but still teach in a virtual classroom? If the University owns the copyright of your material, will you soon have to sign away your rights to your likeness to allow for future use?

We are at a nexus point, a perfect storm of new techniques, faster GPUs and machine learning. As this technology moves out of the research lab and beyond the entertainment industry, will a professional version of Deep Fakes change the education landscape, especially for wide deployment of individualised programs?

At the Motus Lab at The University of Sydney we have been building digital humans and researching their use. Instead of these trend worrying undergraduate students, our research shows that they are not alarmed at all by the advent of AI-driven agents. While some futurists wax lyrical about the ‘Robot Uprising’ or mythical ‘singularities’, in this presentation we examine the current best practice applications of this technology in a very grounded and concrete way. We move past the hype to outline a framework of practical implications and show real-world, state of the art implementations in this rapidly advancing area of research.

Find out more about Mike Seymour

Champagne
06:00 PMPre-dinner drinks – National Museum of Australia – Gandel AtriumNational Museum of Australia

Pre-dinner drinks and canapes at the National Museum of Australia

06:45 PMConference Dinner – National Museum of Australia – Gandel Atrium
11:15 AM - 11:45 AMSession 4: A Blind Taste Test: Managing Large-Scale User Testing of Alternative Systems – Acton Theatre, level 1 By Dr Russell Waldron and Dr Michael de RaadtCanberra Grammar School

How can we avoid bias in the testers of a proposed systems? How can we assess functionality when many of our users have preferences for the form of one system over another? We devised a blind taste test – as close as we could reasonably achieve. As we approached the selection of the school’s main education technology platform, portal, intranet and communications system, we knew that many staff would have loyalties, preferences or apprehension toward particular candidate systems. We engaged in substantial process to bring the right candidates forward: gathering criteria from a wide range of stakeholders, weighting criteria according to stakeholder priorities, and grading software on each criteria to establish a well-justified shortlist. We then established three test sandboxes, populating them with similar test data including both sample content and user accounts, and “branding” them similarly with school colours and styling. We wrote test scripts to guide unfamiliar users through the testing of each function that had been prioritised by stakeholders. Our testers were selected by managers in areas across the school and included teachers, support staff, parents, multilingual users and students. In this presentation we’ll describe the delivery and execution of the testing plan, key results, and reflections on the process. 

11:45 AM - 12:15 PMSession 8: meriSTEM: Leveraging academic expertise to maximise secondary school science impact – Acton Theatre, level 1 By Jay RidgewellThe Australian National University

meriSTEM is an ANU STEM education initiative providing comprehensive, curriculum-aligned, modular resources for senior secondary teachers, enabling them to ‘flip’ their classrooms in order to maximise deep, engaged learning. The purpose of meriSTEM is to increase student achievement, independent inquiry and critical thinking skills in STEM core subjects, while also increasing teacher capacity to facilitate this learning.
Since 2016, meriSTEM has provided a senior physics course to schools across Australia. In 2019 we are continuing to improve this course, while developing equivalent offerings in chemistry, biology, Earth and environmental sciences, and maths. meriSTEM uses Open edX and other free online software to provide the student self-paced component of the resources and we are using multiple methods to improve the accessibility to all Australian students, regardless of physical location and digital resources. In the presentation, we will briefly explain how the request from local teachers set the wheels in motion to establish the meriSTEM program, what we have learned thus far through working with secondary teachers and students and where we are heading next. We will summarise responses from teachers and students using meriSTEM in 2019, and our research questions for a formal evaluation of the project in the coming years.

02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 12 – Workshop: Online course design strategies to increase learning engagement: a meaningful hands-on course design exercise for educators – Acton Theatre, level 1 By Mushtak DawoodUNSW Canberra

With increased demand to provide a greater access to content in higher education, universities have been focusing on developing their online learning courses and programs offered. Blended learning is well established in academia; however, the effectiveness of course design on student’s engagement remains uncertain. Instructors dedicated to teaching and learning are under pressure to explore and evaluate strategies for getting students engaged in their studies. This workshop explores techniques to make online learning productive and engaging, but, more importantly, develop a process for designing courses with student’s engagement in mind. It provides practical and relevant strategies to instructors interested in the integration of planned activities to support a better student’s interaction with the learning process. This hands-on experience will focus on incorporating innovative, synchronous and asynchronous course design strategies and weaving pedagogy into the learning and teaching experience.

03:45 PM - 04:15 PMSession 16: Moruya Mud Fun Play Build: How we used music and dance to fuel the construction of an architecturally engineered multipurpose structure and extract educational outcomes from the process – Acton Theatre, level 1 By David MitsakMud Fun

For the past several years SOL Illawarra Cultural Arts has been working on a vision to validate the power of music, dance,
theatrics, cooperation and teamwork in terms of the real tangible results it can deliver. We decided that nothing could be more tangible than durable shelter. To this end, school teachers (general) music teachers, cultural performing artists and construction industry professionals have been collaborating to develop the “musical mud stomp” and incorporate it into a unique construction process. The results are the creation of architecturally engineered multi-purpose structures on school premises and public spaces and a process that involves the whole community and gives a real sense of ownership in the building. We are simultaneously reviving heritage earthen masonry construction techniques that are culturally significant, environmentally friendly and in ways that give teachers new ideas on how curriculum can be taught. Youth add a unique value to the process that stimulates further questions about the value of play.

Teapot and cup
10:45 AM - 11:15 AMMorning Tea – Springbank room and Canberry room, level 1
12:15 PM - 01:15 PMLunch – Springbank room and Canberry room, level 1
Teapot and cup
03:15 PM - 03:45 PMAfternoon tea – Canberry Room and Springbank room, level 1
coffee cup
08:00 AM - 09:15 AMRegistration – Crawford School, Foyer, level 1
11:15 AM - 11:45 AMSession 1: A Semantic Map and Matrix of Audiovisual Learning Objects – Griffin room, level 1 By Michael GleesonGriffith University

As higher education innovates with blended models of delivery, pre-recorded audiovisual resources are playing an increasingly large part of course content delivery and the student experience. A higher-level design heuristic is required in order for an educationally embedded, holistic and sustainable production of these resources to occur in universities. In this project, we refer to his design heuristic as the combined use of a semantic map and matrix of development for audiovisual learning objects. Their purpose is twofold: to align audiovisual learning objects to course learning outcomes and to achieve well-designed objects at scale of production for a large, comprehensive university. We discuss the implementation of the semantic map and matrix for the development and integration of AV learning objects, emphasising the educational thought behind the map and matrix and the strategies necessary in order to design a university-level coordinated approach to the production of AV learning objects that will be able to meet the needs of more than 400 degree programs.

11:45 AM - 12:15 PMSession 5: Innovating internships for supporting students in work-integrated learning – Griffin room, level 1 By Dr Penny KyburzThe Australian National University

Work integrated learning and professional practice skills are fundamental to computer science education, in addition to forming a requirement for professional body accreditation of our courses. The Research School of Computer Science at ANU offers internship placements as a project-based work integrated learning opportunity for undergraduate and masters students. Our Computer Science Internship program is innovative in its design, as it provides three streams: (1) placement in a host organisation, (2) an academic project-based program and assessment, and (3) professional mentoring and support via workshops and peer circles. Students entering internship placements find themselves challenged by leaving the university to engage in work integrated learning, and even more so if they are international students encountering foreign workplace culture. We support our students in managing and growing through these challenges by providing a supportive network, both academically and professionally. This presentation will cover the design, development, ongoing improvements, challenges, and outcomes of our internship program.

02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 9 – Workshop: Using gamification to create engaging interactive virtual reality teaching resources – Griffin room, level 1 By Claire SeldonNSW Department of Education

Virtual reality (VR) is an innovative new tool available to teachers, both as designers of content and as a tool for student creation. The increased availability of VR equipment and software offers teachers ways to access the VR in their classrooms, this course aims to update their knowledge on how to design and use virtual experiences.​ This workshop will showcase an example of a virtual reality experience that has been designed as an interactive student centred resource by applying the principals of gamification to resource design. Teachers will then be introduced to some web based software that will allow them to create similar experiences.

03:45 PM - 04:15 PMSession 13: How educational and digital lives intersect: Millennials and Gen Z reveal their university experiences through digital storytelling – Griffin room, level 1 By Tingting Yu & Assoc. Prof. Peter BryantThe University of Sydney

How educational and digital lives intersect at the University: Millennials and Generation Z students reveal learning experience through digital storytelling

11:15 AM - 11:45 AMSession 3: Making Connections: Using a Multimodal Approach to Enhance Communication Skills – Lennox room, level 1 By A/Prof Jane Frost and Fellon GaidaUniversity of Canberra

Successful relationships are built on meaningful connections. Using 360 degree technology, digital platforms and realistic patient-centred interaction, students were able to negotiate the complexities of communication in a safe environment and build confidence in their own abilities. A multimodal technology-enhanced approach was used to explore the development of building meaningful connections with people through artefacts in order to facilitate relationship building. This approach was based in transformative learning principles and involved 4 separate activities scaffolded in order to provide a range of experiences from which students could learn, and on which they could reflect. Artefacts such as personal items and photographs allow connections to be made between past and present, time and place, and metaphorically to identity, belonging and attachment. Used to initiate conversation with others, artefacts provided a powerful way to prepare students to connect and build therapeutic relationships with patients.

11:45 AM - 12:15 PMSession 7: Designing eLearning environments for reflection: Applying Moon’s preparation guidelines – Lennox room, level 1 By Sara AbdelmawgoudUNSW Canberra

Preparing students to reflect is one of the key elements of reflective learning. Although the importance of preparation before reflection is clear, it takes a long time and thus it affects the planning and structure of academic experience, learning timing and duration. As a result, researchers suggest creating online ways to facilitate reflective preparation practices. This paper focuses on Moon’s (2004) reflection preparation guidelines and introduces a design that can be used to apply Moon’s reflection preparation practices to an online environment.

03:45 PM - 04:15 PMSession 15: Using Moodle in teaching academic english to international students preparing for a university education – Lennox room, level 1 By Freda Pappas & Mario TorrelliStudy Group Australia (Taylors College)

Teaching English to International students who are about to embark on their tertiary education requires a considered approach, encompassing listening, speaking, reading and writing. As a result this presentation will firstly focus on discussing second language acquisition theories that are now applied to Moodle so that practical activities can be developed to support the teaching of English in a digital environment. The fact that International students arrive with varying levels of computer literacy means the Foundation Program is also responsible for assisting students to learn essential computing skills through Moodle. Such skills are developed as students progress through structured lessons and are graded by Moodle. The presentation will also demonstrate the appropriateness of Moodle for enhancing English skills and how traditional methods can be incorporated within the Second Language learning classroom. The presentation will be supported with currently used Moodle activities that can be adapted and used in most classrooms or teaching programs.

Tulipes
09:15 AM - 09:45 AMWelcome to EdTechPosium 2019 ‘Place, purpose, possibilities’ – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By Associate Professor Alexandra WebbThe Australian National University

Opening address by Associate Professor Alexandra Webb, College of Health and Medicine, The Australian National University

09:45 AM - 10:45 AMKeynote 1: What’s in it for me? Building online spaces that support the right kinds of education – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By Martin DougiamasFounder of Moodle

Moodle is well-known for its eponymous learning platform, used globally, with a focus on collaborative and active learning. Despite this design focus Moodle is often used in different ways that reflect the learning methods that teachers experienced in their own education. Martin will argue that a number of these methods contribute to a problematic culture in student learning. Martin is an advocate for the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals that seek to address these potentially negative trends. He will present some ideas, including some new Moodle products being developed, that provide alternative learning spaces to influence educators to move down better paths.

Find out more about Martin Dougiamas

Erica Southgate
01:15 PM - 02:15 PMKeynote 2: Immersive VR is not one thing: Pedagogical lessons on using VR in real classrooms and how I respond to (pesky) talk of ‘scaling up’ – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By A/Prof Erica Southgate University of Newcastle

This talk will draw on my research on using immersive virtual reality in educational contexts to tease out the interaction between pedagogical, ethical and technical aspects of the technology as they are dealt with in the current literature, and in actual classrooms. The talk will focus on how the literature frames the pedagogy of the technology and the limitation of this for empowering educators to experiment with it and adopting it as part of the fabric of the (physical and virtual) classrooms. The talk will canvas ethical issues that need to addressed and examine why the ‘scaling up’ discourse which permeates the field of immersive learning misunderstands the educational issues related to this emerging technology.

Find out more about Associate Professor Erica Southgate

Mike Seymour
04:15 PM - 05:15 PMKeynote 3: To Affinity and Beyond. Applying entertainment industry technology in digital people in the education sector – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By Mike SeymourCo-founder of fxguide.com and researcher at Motus Lab at the University of Sydney

In keeping with this year’s theme of place, purpose, possibilities, we explore the possibility of using AI and digital people as both educators and educational surrogates. Imagine if your lectures could be updated online by an AI engine.  Perhaps altering a recording of your previous lecture, or updating the video to show you teaching new material? What benefits could this technology bring to students?  Would a girl learn maths better online from a digital avatar that looks like her same age?  Or what if that digital girl was a digital version of herself?

Imagine, if you could leave the University, but still teach in a virtual classroom? If the University owns the copyright of your material, will you soon have to sign away your rights to your likeness to allow for future use?

We are at a nexus point, a perfect storm of new techniques, faster GPUs and machine learning. As this technology moves out of the research lab and beyond the entertainment industry, will a professional version of Deep Fakes change the education landscape, especially for wide deployment of individualised programs?

At the Motus Lab at The University of Sydney we have been building digital humans and researching their use. Instead of these trend worrying undergraduate students, our research shows that they are not alarmed at all by the advent of AI-driven agents. While some futurists wax lyrical about the ‘Robot Uprising’ or mythical ‘singularities’, in this presentation we examine the current best practice applications of this technology in a very grounded and concrete way. We move past the hype to outline a framework of practical implications and show real-world, state of the art implementations in this rapidly advancing area of research.

Find out more about Mike Seymour

11:15 AM - 11:45 AMSession 2: So what is Plagiarism? Why would you need an Anti-Plagiarism Solution? – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Joanne NorburyAndrogogic (Sponsor)

With easy access to information today, original content and copyright rights are highly valued in both the higher education and corporate world. Joanne, a Senior Educational Technologist from Androgogic, will lead a discussion on plagiarism and demonstrate a new, easily integrated tool that supports users to detect their own plagiarism and understand how to cite sources while providing a reliable and scalable automatic text recognition system. She claims that anti-plagiarism software has operated in a monopolised industry, but that, in Urkund, Australians now have a superior and compelling alternative. “The partnership between Androgogic and Urkund is set to be the best of breed anti-plagiarism solution that the educational technology market has been waiting for”, says Joanne, “an effective, scalable solution with industry leading integration that’s easy to use.”

Happy Students
11:45 AM - 12:15 PMSession 6: Is interactive learning social constructivism? Discuss (interactively | socially) – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Dr Joseph Hughes,The Australian National University

There is an increasing prominence of student engagement and interactive learning in higher education discourse. Is interactive learning “just” social constructivism rebranded? Or is there something more fundamental at play here? What role does, could, or should technology play in this landscape? (Why) Do these questions matter? This will not be a “presentation” where I “deliver” answers to these questions. Instead, participants will enter a dialogue aimed at providing (re)newed perspectives to inform both their purpose and possibilities for action in the neo-liberal higher education climate. I will posit that while there is significant overlap, interactive learning is more than social constructivism, but also that social constructivism is more than interactive learning: they have complementary distinctions. Discussing and debating these questions does matter because it raises to the surface our teaching philosophies, practices and strategies: it empowers us to make informed decisions about our actions towards the common goal of student learning. In this presentation, participants will be expected to contribute by engaging interactively and socially, and should BYOD. I encourage a robust discussion and active contribution to the dialogue. The presentation will close with some reflections on how my understanding of the topic has evolved, based on participant contributions.

02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 10 – Workshop: Using Snapchat to enhance learning in the higher education classroom – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Terra StarbirdThe Australian National University

Meet your students where they are by using Snapchat. Social media tools will never replace what a lecturer does, but instead they can amplify a message and clarify content, as well as engage students on their digital turf. Learn the multiple ways you can use Snapchat to engage directly with your students and build core skills and knowledge. This will be a hands-on workshop, focussed on developing the skills to use Snapchat in the higher education classroom to bring the content to life. In the session, participants will learn a number of features of Snapchat that translate directly to higher education, from documenting laboratory practice and field work to the study of art and historical artefacts. Snapchat can also be a great way for lecturers connect with and engage their students, even in larger cohorts. In embracing new technologies, we humanise ourselves to our students and demonstrate that true growth and change happens when we get out our comfort zones and challenge ourselves. Change can be hard and uncomfortable, but in order to evolve and improve our teaching practice, we need to embrace change and take risks.

03:45 PM - 04:15 PMSession 14: Incorporating User Experience principles in your course design without web design experience – how basic customisation can keep learners engaged with your course – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Lisa CaseyDeakin University/Australian Defence College

This presentation aims to help teachers and course creators with their learning design from a User Experience perspective. User Experience is very important in the technological age we live in, as learners expect a certain level of quality and behaviour of online delivery. Rather than creating a course with limited resources or support or using it as a filing cabinet, we will show you are some simple web design and multimedia concepts to make your course more engaging and user friendly. Ease of use, accessibility support, responsiveness of course layout, future proofing, H5P, block and section customisation, and interactive elements are important areas to focus on when developing your course. This presentation is for everyone, the material can help beginners to use some basic interactive tools with no coding experience required, through to those building custom HTML elements to their course. We will also cover ways to keep a online students engaged, through various tools like forums, chats, and virtual classroom. We will also teach you how to build a course template that you can backup and restore for other courses, without breaking any customised elements you’ve built.

Teapot and cup
10:45 AM - 11:15 AMMorning Tea – Springbank room and Canberry room, level 1
12:15 PM - 01:15 PMLunch – Springbank room and Canberry room, level 1
Teapot and cup
03:15 PM - 03:45 PMAfternoon tea – Canberry Room and Springbank room, level 1
  • Display All
  • Acton Theatre
  • Canberry Room
  • Foyer
  • Griffin Room
  • Lennox Room
  • Molonglo Theatre
  • Seminar Room 3
  • Springbank Room
coffee cup
08:00 AM - 09:00 AMCoffee – Foyer, level 1 By Coffee/tea break

Coffee at Crawford School Foyer Level 1

Tulipes
09:00 AM - 09:15 AMWelcome to day 2 – Molonglo Theatre, level 2
Dr Chie Adachi
09:15 AM - 10:15 AMKeynote 4: Belonging and sense-making in a digital world – digital education as ‘courageous’ science – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By Dr Chie AdachiDirector of Digital Learning, Deakin University

The hype of the Fourth Industrial Revolution continues to surround us with a narrative that the future world of work is changing. Learning therefore needs to also change accordingly for us humans to remain competitive and relevant in the 21st century – in a digitally enabled world, with the rise of artificial intelligence. Needless to say, digital learning in the 21st century is everyone’s business.

Drawing from the literature and case studies of digital learning innovation projects within higher education contexts, this talk aims to revive the rhetorical debate by reimagining the notions underpinning digital education and learning – the place where digital learning emerges, physically, virtually and spiritually; the purpose of why digital education is essential for contemporary learners and teachers; and finally, possibilities of where digital learning might take us into the future.

Threading these discussions, the notion of belonging as a basic human need will shed us light in this exploration. Guerin and McMenamin (2018) noted that “belonging can be understood as a dynamic construct that is shaped by our interactions with people, places and things (p.2).” The act of belonging and sense-making is therefore a form of learning and largely impacts on the construction of our ‘authentic self’. In a highly digital context, however, the ways in which we connect and make meaning of life, work and relationships can be unique and complex. Given these digital performances are inherently vulnerable, the learning of these ought to be courageous. In conclusion, this talk offers some practical recommendations for the future of digital education by reframing it as ‘courageous’ science.

Find out more about Dr Chie Adachi

coffee cup
10:15 AM - 10:45 AMMorning Tea – Springbank Room and Canberry room, level 1
10:45 AM - 11:15 AMSession 17: Learning for the ages: How the My Aged Care Learning Environment (MACLE) is transforming accredited training – Griffin room, level 1 By Sophie Gimel & Binbin YangCIT Solutions

In 2017, CIT Solutions, in partnership with the Department of Health, completed the My Aged Care Capability Project, a nationwide investigation into the My Aged Care workforce capability development requirements. The My Aged Care workforce includes contact centre staff; home support assessors; comprehensive assessors; and service providers. Feedback from this diverse and dispersed workforce provided the rationale for an online learning environment that would be current, authoritative, and engaging. MACLE, a customised Moodle environment, has been designed to efficiently guide learners through learning and assessment activities to fulfil the requirements for their statements of attainment, and ultimately be better equipped to provide a quality service for older people. Since its “go live” launch late 2018, MACLE has been positively received by the workforce who are enjoying the interactivity, structure, design and content of over 28 different courses, ranging from “Ageing and the Concept of Positive Ageing” to “Wellness and Reablement”. Importantly, it seamlessly incorporates the application of theory into the workplace so that the learning is grounded in practice and relevant. Since its launch, MACLE has provided engaging currency and accredited training opportunities to a workforce that is time-poor but needs to keep up with an ever-changing environment.

10:45 AM - 11:15 AMSession 18: The challenge of change: Engaging more effectively with students through video feedback – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Kathryn Sainsbury & Dr Jane FrostUniversity of Canberra

Feedback is an essential tool that allows students to develop insights into their own learning. Historically written feedback has been the accepted form of providing feedback to students, however there is now a move to change to more innovative and student-centred modes of feedback. The use of video is one emerging platform to provide feedback to students. Assisted by the incorporation of the function in most learning management systems this form of providing feedback is now accessible to all. The value of video feedback has been well documented in the literature however embracing the change can be both challenging and expose our vulnerabilities. Video feedback is engaging and enhances reflexivity. It is time effective once perfected, and we know that students do not receive adequate meaningful feedback report low levels of satisfaction with teaching, may lose motivation and achieve less. So why is it now not the norm? We will present our journey with video feedback, the good, the bad, and the ugly, as well as presenting student feedback we received.

10:45 AM - 11:15 AMSession 19: Virtual reality for physics education – Lennox room, level 1 By Dr John DebsThe Australian National University

Virtual reality (VR) has reached the point where its accessibility and immersion is sufficient to give realistic experiences. One of the most exciting possibilities is the ability to visualise invisible or impossible worlds. For example, electromagnetism is a frequently challenging concept to teach, in particular because students need to build a mental model of what a ‘field’ is. VR gives us the ability to give people a realistic representation of fields, of higher complexity than that possible on a 2D screen. Furthermore, it can allow dynamic manipulation, simulation, and testing – effectively offering students a sandbox in which to experiment. Another application is the use of VR to allow students to experience worlds that manifest their misconceptions. Led by well studied and measured misconceptions using the FCI, students are asked to predict what forces exist in a given situation. They are then given a world in which those forces are present, and if incorrect, experience a situation that behaves counter intuitively thereby triggering cognitive dissonance. They can then be guided to reassess their views and correct their misconception. We have been developing both of these apps over the last two years. We will share positive preliminary results with small groups of students.

10:45 AM - 11:15 AMSession 20: What retro tech can teach – Acton Theatre, level 1 By Jeremy MannNational Film and Sound Archive

The National Film and Sound Archive is a physical place with a digital space for audiovisual material. Our purpose is to collect, preserve and share Australia’s past and present audiovisual production. In doing so we have become the custodians of more than 3 million items and a diverse range of old and new technologies. In our education programs, we harness the power of retro technology to educate, excite and inspire the next generation of creators. This presentation will explore the strategies we use to encourage student familiarity, competency and confidence with old and new technology.
(Strategies include:

  • inviting students to discover, tinker with, and recreate old technologies.
  • discovering the progression of technology and how it has transformed our lives and society;
  • exploring the possibilities of modern and emerging technologies or storytelling and preservation.
  • inspiring students to design and create their own productions with their own devices.)
Peter Radoll
11:15 AM - 12:15 AMKeynote 5: Universities and Reconciliation – why has it taken so long to get here? – Molonglo theatre, level 2 By Professor Peter Radoll Dean of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Leadership and Strategy, University of Canberra

The University of Canberra launched its first Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander strategic plan in 2017 with the aim of improving outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples across all areas and functions of the university namely: Education, Research, Employment and Community Engagement. UC aims to have; parity in Indigenous and non-Indigenous completions by 2022, 3% Indigenous Employment, a comprehensive engagement strategy and an Indigenous lead research Institute.

As important as the Indigenous strategy is, as education providers move to delivering digital materials it is important to consider our audience. Peter will examine elements of the Indigenous strategy and explore the challenge of providing digital content to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Find out more about Professor Peter Radoll

ANU sculpture donut like
12:15 PM - 02:15 PMPlaces Lunch

We have an exciting line up of six tour options that you can select from (numbers of participants may be limited with some of the tours). These tours will run during our extended lunch break on Day 2 and you will be provided with a boxed picnic lunch to take with you on your walk. The amount of walking will vary depending on the tour. You will need to select and sign up for the walking tour you would like to go on. Signup sheets will be available in the Springbank room main breakout space where morning teas and lunches will be served.

  • Remember to collect your lunch as you leave the Keynote 5 talk from the Lunch area ASAP.
  • Once you have collected your lunch proceed outside to find your walking guide in the Crawford Central courtyard (See map) who has a possum colour coded to your walk, refer to coloured circle, and will take you to where you need to go.
  • Please also wear comfortable shoes for walking for Day 2 and bring a drink bottle and a hat.

More infos on place walk tours

02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 21 – Workshop: Let’s gamify it! A rapid gamification design workshop – Griffin room, level 1 By Kerstin OberprielerUniversity of Canberra and PentaQuest

Kerstin Oberprieler will run an engaging and interactive workshop taking participants through the gamification design methodology. Drawing on her many years of practical experience of designing and delivering gamification experiences and her PhD research in gamification, participants will walk away inspired, excited, and with a gamification concept they can implement. We will use the popular PentaQuest Gamification Cards, which have been used successfully by hundreds of workshop attendees in Australia, Singapore, Germany and US.

02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 22 – Workshop: Imagining an established face-to-face pedagogical pattern in a virtual environment – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Georgie Barden & Yvonne WisbeyUniversity of Canberra

In this workshop, participants will be invited to share their expertise with educational technologies and online teaching pedagogy to help address a well-known dilemma; creating an effective virtual equivalent of a pedagogical pattern that works well in a face to face format. How well can an established model for workshop delivery that incorporates indigenous ways of learning, experiential learning and reflective practice be re-imagined for a virtual environment? Together we will explore the possibilities afforded by facilitating learning in a new place (online), with a view to maintaining the clear sense of purpose of the original model.

photography
02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 23 – Presentation: Making a Case for Online Exams: Efficiency, Integrity and Insights – Lennox room, level 1 By Dr Patrick Tran & Dr Mathew Hillier,UNSW

Technology is undoubtedly changing the way learning takes place and how students are being evaluated. Many institutions have implemented Digital Assessments (DA) strategies not only to optimize their assessment processes but also enhance students’ learning experience through the use of online learning platforms.
This presentation discusses a comprehensive approach to an emerging DA area, online exams, with strong focus on exam efficiency, integrity and insights. We will look at the use of online quizzes in Moodle and technical tools that help create and maintain questions, safeguard online exams and enhance our understanding of assessment data.
Experience learned from our DA pilots will also be presented.
After the overview in the first part of the session, there will be the opportunity for general questions on digital assessment and detailed responses to technical queries.

02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 24 – Workshop: Strategies for driving innovation and change in universities from central units – Acton Theatre, level 1 By Dr Katie Freund & Rebecca Goodway,The Australian National University and Swinburne institute of technology

Central learning and teaching units often operate in a ‘hub and spoke’ model, operating outside of faculty structures and supporting the entire institution. This model is one that presents unique challenges when it comes to driving innovation and change with technology-enhanced learning.

In this fishbowl session, Katie and Rebecca will invite colleagues from central and faculty/college teams to share their experiences and challenges of fostering effective relationships and providing scalable support to teaching staff in the implementation and use of learning technologies and innovations. Members of the audience will be invited to join the rotating panel to respond to provocations around the roles of central and faculty/college-based teams, and collaboratively develop strategies to:

  • Address misconceptions, misunderstandings and silos which often result from the hub and spoke model
  • Promote a learning and teaching culture which embraces innovation, change, and risk
  • Ensure that learning and teaching initiatives and projects are inclusive of all relevant stakeholders and perspectives (faculty, IT, etc)
  • Empower teaching staff to engage with, and harness the affordances of technology-enhanced learning (and move away from a deficit model of central unit engagement)
Teapot and cup
03:15 PM - 03:30 PMAfternoon Tea – Canberry room and Springbank room, level 1
Leanne Cover
03:30 PM - 04:30 PMKeynote 6 – Leanne Cover: A new approach to organisational change – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By Leanne CoverCEO Canberra Institute of Technology

As the world becomes increasingly connected and complex, traditional institutions are required to adapt and coevolve with the changing times, and apply knowledge in a much-more nuanced way to remain relevant and sustainable in the long term.

Join Leanne in exploring CIT’s change journey which has been underpinned by contemporary organisational transformation theories related to connectivity, complexity and networks and discover how these have enabled transformation across an organisation with a rich history and diverse workforce.

CIT, like all education and learning institutions is facing a time of change, opportunity and uncertainty. CIT is adapting and co evolving to maximise its place within the broader ecosystem in the ever increasingly connected and complex environment we are operating in. CIT’s purpose for this work is to build our capability and capacity by exploring different ways of working to meet the emerging education and training needs of our customers. We are doing this by adopting an organisation-wide shift in new thinking and new priorities, with a vision of being the best we can be.

In this keynote address Leanne will share her experiences in leading this transformation and how it is supporting CIT in meeting its commitments to provide the skills needed for the new world of work and global marketplace and the possibilities this represents.

Find out more about Leanne Cover

04:30 PM - 04:45 PMConference closing and handover – Molonglo theatre, level 2
10:45 AM - 11:15 AMSession 20: What retro tech can teach – Acton Theatre, level 1 By Jeremy MannNational Film and Sound Archive

The National Film and Sound Archive is a physical place with a digital space for audiovisual material. Our purpose is to collect, preserve and share Australia’s past and present audiovisual production. In doing so we have become the custodians of more than 3 million items and a diverse range of old and new technologies. In our education programs, we harness the power of retro technology to educate, excite and inspire the next generation of creators. This presentation will explore the strategies we use to encourage student familiarity, competency and confidence with old and new technology.
(Strategies include:

  • inviting students to discover, tinker with, and recreate old technologies.
  • discovering the progression of technology and how it has transformed our lives and society;
  • exploring the possibilities of modern and emerging technologies or storytelling and preservation.
  • inspiring students to design and create their own productions with their own devices.)
02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 24 – Workshop: Strategies for driving innovation and change in universities from central units – Acton Theatre, level 1 By Dr Katie Freund & Rebecca Goodway,The Australian National University and Swinburne institute of technology

Central learning and teaching units often operate in a ‘hub and spoke’ model, operating outside of faculty structures and supporting the entire institution. This model is one that presents unique challenges when it comes to driving innovation and change with technology-enhanced learning.

In this fishbowl session, Katie and Rebecca will invite colleagues from central and faculty/college teams to share their experiences and challenges of fostering effective relationships and providing scalable support to teaching staff in the implementation and use of learning technologies and innovations. Members of the audience will be invited to join the rotating panel to respond to provocations around the roles of central and faculty/college-based teams, and collaboratively develop strategies to:

  • Address misconceptions, misunderstandings and silos which often result from the hub and spoke model
  • Promote a learning and teaching culture which embraces innovation, change, and risk
  • Ensure that learning and teaching initiatives and projects are inclusive of all relevant stakeholders and perspectives (faculty, IT, etc)
  • Empower teaching staff to engage with, and harness the affordances of technology-enhanced learning (and move away from a deficit model of central unit engagement)
coffee cup
10:15 AM - 10:45 AMMorning Tea – Springbank Room and Canberry room, level 1
Teapot and cup
03:15 PM - 03:30 PMAfternoon Tea – Canberry room and Springbank room, level 1
coffee cup
08:00 AM - 09:00 AMCoffee – Foyer, level 1 By Coffee/tea break

Coffee at Crawford School Foyer Level 1

10:45 AM - 11:15 AMSession 17: Learning for the ages: How the My Aged Care Learning Environment (MACLE) is transforming accredited training – Griffin room, level 1 By Sophie Gimel & Binbin YangCIT Solutions

In 2017, CIT Solutions, in partnership with the Department of Health, completed the My Aged Care Capability Project, a nationwide investigation into the My Aged Care workforce capability development requirements. The My Aged Care workforce includes contact centre staff; home support assessors; comprehensive assessors; and service providers. Feedback from this diverse and dispersed workforce provided the rationale for an online learning environment that would be current, authoritative, and engaging. MACLE, a customised Moodle environment, has been designed to efficiently guide learners through learning and assessment activities to fulfil the requirements for their statements of attainment, and ultimately be better equipped to provide a quality service for older people. Since its “go live” launch late 2018, MACLE has been positively received by the workforce who are enjoying the interactivity, structure, design and content of over 28 different courses, ranging from “Ageing and the Concept of Positive Ageing” to “Wellness and Reablement”. Importantly, it seamlessly incorporates the application of theory into the workplace so that the learning is grounded in practice and relevant. Since its launch, MACLE has provided engaging currency and accredited training opportunities to a workforce that is time-poor but needs to keep up with an ever-changing environment.

02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 21 – Workshop: Let’s gamify it! A rapid gamification design workshop – Griffin room, level 1 By Kerstin OberprielerUniversity of Canberra and PentaQuest

Kerstin Oberprieler will run an engaging and interactive workshop taking participants through the gamification design methodology. Drawing on her many years of practical experience of designing and delivering gamification experiences and her PhD research in gamification, participants will walk away inspired, excited, and with a gamification concept they can implement. We will use the popular PentaQuest Gamification Cards, which have been used successfully by hundreds of workshop attendees in Australia, Singapore, Germany and US.

10:45 AM - 11:15 AMSession 19: Virtual reality for physics education – Lennox room, level 1 By Dr John DebsThe Australian National University

Virtual reality (VR) has reached the point where its accessibility and immersion is sufficient to give realistic experiences. One of the most exciting possibilities is the ability to visualise invisible or impossible worlds. For example, electromagnetism is a frequently challenging concept to teach, in particular because students need to build a mental model of what a ‘field’ is. VR gives us the ability to give people a realistic representation of fields, of higher complexity than that possible on a 2D screen. Furthermore, it can allow dynamic manipulation, simulation, and testing – effectively offering students a sandbox in which to experiment. Another application is the use of VR to allow students to experience worlds that manifest their misconceptions. Led by well studied and measured misconceptions using the FCI, students are asked to predict what forces exist in a given situation. They are then given a world in which those forces are present, and if incorrect, experience a situation that behaves counter intuitively thereby triggering cognitive dissonance. They can then be guided to reassess their views and correct their misconception. We have been developing both of these apps over the last two years. We will share positive preliminary results with small groups of students.

photography
02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 23 – Presentation: Making a Case for Online Exams: Efficiency, Integrity and Insights – Lennox room, level 1 By Dr Patrick Tran & Dr Mathew Hillier,UNSW

Technology is undoubtedly changing the way learning takes place and how students are being evaluated. Many institutions have implemented Digital Assessments (DA) strategies not only to optimize their assessment processes but also enhance students’ learning experience through the use of online learning platforms.
This presentation discusses a comprehensive approach to an emerging DA area, online exams, with strong focus on exam efficiency, integrity and insights. We will look at the use of online quizzes in Moodle and technical tools that help create and maintain questions, safeguard online exams and enhance our understanding of assessment data.
Experience learned from our DA pilots will also be presented.
After the overview in the first part of the session, there will be the opportunity for general questions on digital assessment and detailed responses to technical queries.

Tulipes
09:00 AM - 09:15 AMWelcome to day 2 – Molonglo Theatre, level 2
Dr Chie Adachi
09:15 AM - 10:15 AMKeynote 4: Belonging and sense-making in a digital world – digital education as ‘courageous’ science – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By Dr Chie AdachiDirector of Digital Learning, Deakin University

The hype of the Fourth Industrial Revolution continues to surround us with a narrative that the future world of work is changing. Learning therefore needs to also change accordingly for us humans to remain competitive and relevant in the 21st century – in a digitally enabled world, with the rise of artificial intelligence. Needless to say, digital learning in the 21st century is everyone’s business.

Drawing from the literature and case studies of digital learning innovation projects within higher education contexts, this talk aims to revive the rhetorical debate by reimagining the notions underpinning digital education and learning – the place where digital learning emerges, physically, virtually and spiritually; the purpose of why digital education is essential for contemporary learners and teachers; and finally, possibilities of where digital learning might take us into the future.

Threading these discussions, the notion of belonging as a basic human need will shed us light in this exploration. Guerin and McMenamin (2018) noted that “belonging can be understood as a dynamic construct that is shaped by our interactions with people, places and things (p.2).” The act of belonging and sense-making is therefore a form of learning and largely impacts on the construction of our ‘authentic self’. In a highly digital context, however, the ways in which we connect and make meaning of life, work and relationships can be unique and complex. Given these digital performances are inherently vulnerable, the learning of these ought to be courageous. In conclusion, this talk offers some practical recommendations for the future of digital education by reframing it as ‘courageous’ science.

Find out more about Dr Chie Adachi

Peter Radoll
11:15 AM - 12:15 AMKeynote 5: Universities and Reconciliation – why has it taken so long to get here? – Molonglo theatre, level 2 By Professor Peter Radoll Dean of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Leadership and Strategy, University of Canberra

The University of Canberra launched its first Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander strategic plan in 2017 with the aim of improving outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples across all areas and functions of the university namely: Education, Research, Employment and Community Engagement. UC aims to have; parity in Indigenous and non-Indigenous completions by 2022, 3% Indigenous Employment, a comprehensive engagement strategy and an Indigenous lead research Institute.

As important as the Indigenous strategy is, as education providers move to delivering digital materials it is important to consider our audience. Peter will examine elements of the Indigenous strategy and explore the challenge of providing digital content to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Find out more about Professor Peter Radoll

Leanne Cover
03:30 PM - 04:30 PMKeynote 6 – Leanne Cover: A new approach to organisational change – Molonglo Theatre, level 2 By Leanne CoverCEO Canberra Institute of Technology

As the world becomes increasingly connected and complex, traditional institutions are required to adapt and coevolve with the changing times, and apply knowledge in a much-more nuanced way to remain relevant and sustainable in the long term.

Join Leanne in exploring CIT’s change journey which has been underpinned by contemporary organisational transformation theories related to connectivity, complexity and networks and discover how these have enabled transformation across an organisation with a rich history and diverse workforce.

CIT, like all education and learning institutions is facing a time of change, opportunity and uncertainty. CIT is adapting and co evolving to maximise its place within the broader ecosystem in the ever increasingly connected and complex environment we are operating in. CIT’s purpose for this work is to build our capability and capacity by exploring different ways of working to meet the emerging education and training needs of our customers. We are doing this by adopting an organisation-wide shift in new thinking and new priorities, with a vision of being the best we can be.

In this keynote address Leanne will share her experiences in leading this transformation and how it is supporting CIT in meeting its commitments to provide the skills needed for the new world of work and global marketplace and the possibilities this represents.

Find out more about Leanne Cover

04:30 PM - 04:45 PMConference closing and handover – Molonglo theatre, level 2
10:45 AM - 11:15 AMSession 18: The challenge of change: Engaging more effectively with students through video feedback – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Kathryn Sainsbury & Dr Jane FrostUniversity of Canberra

Feedback is an essential tool that allows students to develop insights into their own learning. Historically written feedback has been the accepted form of providing feedback to students, however there is now a move to change to more innovative and student-centred modes of feedback. The use of video is one emerging platform to provide feedback to students. Assisted by the incorporation of the function in most learning management systems this form of providing feedback is now accessible to all. The value of video feedback has been well documented in the literature however embracing the change can be both challenging and expose our vulnerabilities. Video feedback is engaging and enhances reflexivity. It is time effective once perfected, and we know that students do not receive adequate meaningful feedback report low levels of satisfaction with teaching, may lose motivation and achieve less. So why is it now not the norm? We will present our journey with video feedback, the good, the bad, and the ugly, as well as presenting student feedback we received.

02:15 PM - 03:15 PMSession 22 – Workshop: Imagining an established face-to-face pedagogical pattern in a virtual environment – Seminar room 3, level 1 By Georgie Barden & Yvonne WisbeyUniversity of Canberra

In this workshop, participants will be invited to share their expertise with educational technologies and online teaching pedagogy to help address a well-known dilemma; creating an effective virtual equivalent of a pedagogical pattern that works well in a face to face format. How well can an established model for workshop delivery that incorporates indigenous ways of learning, experiential learning and reflective practice be re-imagined for a virtual environment? Together we will explore the possibilities afforded by facilitating learning in a new place (online), with a view to maintaining the clear sense of purpose of the original model.

coffee cup
10:15 AM - 10:45 AMMorning Tea – Springbank Room and Canberry room, level 1
Teapot and cup
03:15 PM - 03:30 PMAfternoon Tea – Canberry room and Springbank room, level 1